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Suppose I'm in the middle of a multi-day tournament, and pairings have been posted for the next round. Can I request (i.e. request from a TD) to see the submitted score sheets of my opponent from his past rounds during the tournament, for example to refresh my memory of the openings he's likely to play?

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Can I request (i.e. request from a TD) to see the submitted score sheets of my opponent from his past rounds during the tournament, for example to refresh my memory of the openings he's likely to play?

You can ask but in general the answer you will get is "No".

You have no automatic right to this level of service from the tournament.

Many lower level tournaments will not be collecting game scores and so not transcribing the games. The information you want will therefore not be available to anyone apart from your opponent and not even then if they already threw the scoresheets away.

Top level tournaments will be broadcasting games to services like Chess24 via DGT boards and so players can get all the latest games as soon as they are played. In that case there is no point in asking the arbiter.

That said, some tournaments are very good at putting the games online. When I played in the 2019 Isle of Man "patzer" level tournament the brilliant chief arbiter usually had the games from the latest round entered and uploaded to the tournament website by the time I got back to the hotel after playing my game. Simply outstanding and very much appreciated by me.

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    I would tend to assume that, in tournaments where game info is not otherwise available, it would be perfectly legitimate for a player's coach or other associate to sit in the audience of a game (between two other players) and transcribe the moves manually. That's probably not the best use of a coach's time, but I find it hard to believe a tournament could have any valid objection to such a course of action, assuming it didn't distract anyone or otherwise cause a nuisance.
    – Kevin
    Dec 29, 2022 at 6:19
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    @Kevin You would be wrong. There is no right to even be a spectator.
    – Brian Towers
    Dec 29, 2022 at 11:36
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    If I noticed a third party taking notes/recording while playing one of my games at a tournament I suspect I would find it distracting enough to ask them to desist - and if they continued I would call the appropriate person over. Just google your opponent in your own time - most tournament players have enough games available online to find out something interesting
    – Ian Bush
    Dec 29, 2022 at 12:43
  • @IanBush At the club level, where would one expect to find games available online? Jan 5, 2023 at 17:13
  • I'm a club player. Google my name + chess games and you'll find enough to be interesting
    – Ian Bush
    Jan 5, 2023 at 17:48

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