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Played by me yesterday in the Hamburg team championship.

[FEN ""]
 1. d4 f5 2. h3 Nf6 3. g4 fxg4 4. hxg4 Nxg4 5. Qd3 g6 6. Nf3 d6 7. Bh3 Nc6 8. Bxg4 Bxg4 9. Rxh7 Bf5 10. Rxh8 Bxd3 11. Bh6 Kd7 12. Rxf8 Qxf8 13. Bxf8 Bf5 14. Bh6 Rh8 15. Bc1 e5 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. c3 Ke6 18. Na3 a6 19. b3 b5 20. Bb2 Rd8 21. Rd1 Rh8 22. Kd2 Rb8 23. Rg1 a5 24. e4 Bxe4 25. Ng5+ Kf5 26. Nxe4 Kxe4 27. Rxg6 Ne7 28. Re6 Nf5 29. c4 bxc4 30. Rxe5+ Kf4 31. Nxc4 a4 32. Kc2 axb3+ 33. axb3 Rc8 34. Bc1+ Kg4 35. f3+ 1-0

Let's gloss over the details (9.Rxh7 is a bluff, 13...Be4 is a bit stronger, any analysis would be OT here but feel free to put it into comments) and just look at the motif: Bc1-h6-f8-h6-c1 (the latter mandatory to block the 1st rank against Nb4 Na3 Rh1+. I know a study where White returns six (?!) pieces to homebase, but here the bishop even starts from it. Also I recall some game moves (Alekhine?) Q-c1-g5-c1 or the like, but that's not homebase (and it was a "positional combination" anyway). Thus:

Can you show me a combination where the player gets advantage from developing a piece and later returning it to the homebase square? (Patterned search should be possible. Ra1-b1-a1 for an attack on the queenside counts, for example, even if it isn't that spectacular.) Bonus for longer running around and no inbetweens (like my 12.Rxf8).

1 Answer 1

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Game dug up by my problemist buddy Siegfried, to whom the credit shall go. Even two!! retreats.

Roman Dzindzichashvili vs Yuri Sakharov, Soviet Jr-ch (1957), URS

[FEN " "]
1.e4 c5 2.c3 Nf6 3.e5 Nd5 4.d4 cxd4 5.cxd4 d6 6.Nf3 Nc6 7.Be2 Bf5 8.O-O dxe5 9.dxe5 e6 10.Bd2 Ndb4 11.Nc3 Nd3 12.Bg5 Nxb2 13.Qxd8+ Nxd8 14.Bb5+ Nc6 15.Nd4 Bd3 16.Nxc6 Bxf1 17.Bxf1 bxc6 18.Bc1 Ba3 19.Nb1 1-0

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