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I recently played a tournament game with no time control. It takes my opponent at least 5 minutes, sometimes longer, to make (almost) every move. The game started at 6pm and lasted 3.5 hours. If I also move as slow as he does, the game may not end until midnight and it will be inconvenient for myself and my family (my opponent is an unmarried man). Later in the game, I lost my patience and made a few fast moves (including a blunder) to avoid dragging the game out too long. Eventually the game ended in a draw.

Technically he did not violate any rules; without a time control, he has every right to take his time for all the moves. Practically I find it inconvenient for me. Is there anything that I can do about it in a no-time-control tournament?

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    If you find no time control tournaments very slow then why do you join them? I don't think there's any way to make the game faster unless you ask your opponent to take less time(which you can't as they are playing with no time control). Apr 14, 2022 at 3:41
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    I had never heard of a non time-control tournament before. Are they common? Where? Apr 14, 2022 at 4:26
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    3.5 hours isn't especially long for a Tournament OTB game
    – Ian Bush
    Apr 14, 2022 at 6:42
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    The only "no control" tourneys I know of are the <12 year kids championships in our town and even there the direction reserved to add a clock "in good judgement" if it drags out eternally. (Always worked.) Apr 14, 2022 at 7:03
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    @AbhyudayVaish, this is a tournament organized by my school for the teachers to play against the students. I feel (almost) obligated to participate. Usually my opponents (as students) are not as patient, but this time my opponent is unusually slow.
    – Zuriel
    Apr 14, 2022 at 14:14

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I have only ever been the arbiter in two official tournaments where there was no time control. Both were for very weak juniors. Games were scheduled for 30 minutes and so any game that lasted for 20 minutes and which looked like it could drag on had a clock introduced with 5 minutes per player and no increment. In those cases the mere introduction of a clock led to an impressive speeding up of the players.

I'm guess that you are neither a junior nor a very weak player, which begs the question, how did you even manage to find such a tournament which would accept you as one of the players?

Nevertheless, the answer to your problem is simple. If such tournaments don't suit you then don't enter. Unless you are incarcerated in an institution you almost certainly have other choices open to you.

If the tournament is particularly attractive to you for other reasons then perhaps suggest to the organizers that they introduce clocks for games which last more than a certain time, say 4 hours in the case that it starts at 6pm. After all, the organizers will also have homes to go to and they also have a limit on the time they are allowed in the building.

If 3.5 hours is too long for you to play a game of chess (insufficient patience / sitzfleisch) then play in tournaments with quick, clock-controlled time controls like rapid or blitz.

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    Thank you for your answer! This is a tournament organized by my school for the teachers to play against the students. I feel (almost) obligated to participate. Usually, my opponents (as students) are not as patient, but this time my opponent is unusually slow.
    – Zuriel
    Apr 14, 2022 at 14:17
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    Then next time I would suggest to the organizer to have a rule to introduce clocks after a certain time (say 2 hours). You could offer to liaise with your chess club to borrow some clocks for the evening.
    – Brian Towers
    Apr 14, 2022 at 16:35

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