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A new document has appeared on the FIDE website called FIDE Rating Regulations effective from 1 January 2022.

What are the significant changes from the previous rating regulations?

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It is perhaps also worth noting that the previous rules last changed in February 2021 according to the, also changed, name of the previous rules: Rating Regulations effective from 1 July 2017 till 31 December 2021 (with amendments effective from 1 February 2021). So, also worth noting what these changes were.

The February 2021 changes relate to the new form of "Hybrid Chess" and how it is incorporated into the rating system. Specifically article 2:

  1. Laws to be followed

2.1 Play must take place according to the FIDE Laws of Chess or the Regulations for Hybrid Chess Competitions (Part IIIb within the FIDE Online Chess Regulations).

So, something which is already in force but new this year is that hybrid chess results can also be incorporated into regular over the board chess ratings.

When it comes to new rating regulations from 1st January 2022 the main one is in the time controls applying to players of different strengths.

Here is what the old rules say:

  1. Rate of Play

1.1 For a game to be rated each player must have the following minimum periods in which to complete all the moves, assuming the game lasts 60 moves.
Where at least one of the players in the game has a rating 2200 or higher, each player must have a minimum of 120 minutes.
Where at least one of the players in the game has a rating 1600 or higher, each player must have a minimum of 90 minutes.
Where both of the players in the game are rated below 1600, each player must have a minimum of 60 minutes.

1.2 Where a certain number of moves is specified in the first time control, it shall be 40 moves.

And the new rules:

  1.   Rate of Play
    

1.1 For a game to be rated each player must at the start of the tournament have the following minimum periods in which to complete all the moves, assuming the game lasts 60 moves.

Where at least one of the players in the game has a rating of 2400 or higher, each player must have a minimum of 120 minutes.

Where at least one of the players in the game has a rating 1800 or higher, each player must have a minimum of 90 minutes.

Where both of the players in the game are rated below 1800, each player must have a minimum of 60 minutes.

1.2 Where a certain number of moves is specified in the first time control, it shall be at least 30 moves.

So, two significant differences.

  • Previously when one of the players had a rating of 2200 or higher the minimum time for the game was 2 hours for each player. This has changed to 2400 or higher. Effectively this means that league chess below IM level can now be FIDE rated whereas before it had to be below CM level.
  • Previously if there was an intermediate time control this could not be before move 40. Now this has moved to move 30.
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  • What is "league chess" in that context? Is this referencing some specific chess league that has a short time control like that?
    – koedem
    Dec 8, 2021 at 23:16
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    @koedem Local leagues in England (and Germany when I lived there) often have pub-based clubs and teams. The club either gets a free room / bar in the pub one night a week or pays a nominal amount on the understanding that everybody will buy at least one drink. Closing time places a hard deadline by which time games must end and so 3 hour games / time controls are quite common. Although mostly catering to weaker i.e <2200 players the top teams may still attract one or two 2200-2300 players.
    – Brian Towers
    Dec 8, 2021 at 23:24
  • Interesting, when reading leagues I would have interpreted official leagues with different clubs matching up (which then typically would be a long time control league). I suspect at least nowadays these inofficial club internal games are more rare at least in Germany, since I've never seen one of those. Well, I write that... there are some club championships in some clubs but those are usually not even rated by national rating (and also often are long time controls but maybe not always)
    – koedem
    Dec 8, 2021 at 23:26
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    @koedem No. This evening (Thursday) my club A team has a home league match against another club A team in local division 1. Our club is based in a pub. The league time control is 75+10. Actually less than 90 minutes but guaranteed to finish comfortably before closing time. Our 4 players are 2200+, 2x2000+ and 1900+. If the league changed the time control to 80+10, which would still be fine for pub closing time, our leagues could be FIDE rated. Our club championship could also be FIDE rated but only because I'm an FA but then I wouldn't be able to play.
    – Brian Towers
    Dec 9, 2021 at 0:25

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