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I have been taking some lessons with an opening coach, and I have now got an extensive repertoire that I need to memorise. I have a big qualifying tournament in 2 weeks and up until that time I want to try and memorise at least the mainlines of all the variations, but best case scenario would be to commit the entire thing to my long term memory.

The repertoire is in Chessbase, and I am currently using the 'replay training' and simply looking through the moves to try and memorise them. I feel that this strategy is inefficient and ineffective, and I was wondering if anyone knew a better way to memorise opening moves or if anyone knows some software I can export a game file to and then use to help me memorise.

From brainstorming I think it might be useful to try looking at games of the openings, to get good feels for the ideas behind the moves so that I can remember them more easily rather than just arbitrary numbers and letters - from my research the human mind is much better at remembering ideas instead of numerical data.

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    No matter how extensive it is, no repertoire will possibly account for every possible path your opponents might take. The idea-based approach from your last paragraph is by far the most efficient and sustainable not because it makes "memorising" repertoire moves easier, but more importantly because it enables you to find answers to moves outside of your repertoire! – Annatar Mar 15 at 10:05
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    @Annatar yeah, you're right! I'll use the tool that lets me look at many games from masters in certain positions and ask my coach questions about things I'm not sure I understand. – Max Armstrong Mar 15 at 12:05
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ChessTempo has an opening trainer where you can input your repertoire. Then it will throw you a random-ish position from it and let you continue.

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