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I was recently surprised by the following drawing idea, black to move:

6k1/pR3pbp/6p1/1Q6/8/5nP1/PP1r3P/5K2 b - - 0 1

In this position black can play Nxh2+ and, no matter white's king move, move the knight back with Nf3 and make a repetition (or win!).

It is a win if white decides to run to the h1 corner because for example 1...Nxh2+ Kg1 2. Nf3+ Kh1 3.Rh2#. If instead white goes for the rook, then 1...Nxh2+ Ke1 2.Nf3+ Kf1 (only legal move) and we have repeated the position.

Is there a source where I can find a collection of drawing ideas like the above?

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    This question feels misguided to me. There are some beginning/intermediate players who seem to think that the way to improve is to learn more rules of thumb and become better at recognizing when they apply, when, actually, the way to improve is to become better at raw computation. You don't learn to find draws by seeing them in a book and recognizing them; you learn to find draws by computing out the moves at the board, just as you have done in writing up the question. (Of course, books aren't useless, but this question feels too book-reliant to me.) – Alexander Woo Dec 29 '20 at 20:45
  • I know it is an old question and an old comment, but sorry, I can't hide how strongly I disagree with this comment. Raw computation is, unless we are talking about top gms, for engines, not humans. It is very inefficient in the sense of energy spent, it is very unreliable in the sense of it is easy to go wrong, and there is a lot of positions where computation does not help, while understanding does. On the contrary, it is a very good idea to learn patterns like this one and be able to recognize them in the game. Unfortunately I am not aware of such collections, which is a shame. – sleepy Mar 29 at 10:39
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Look at mikail tal's games. They are one of the most aggressive chess games played in the history of chess. It is quite splendid. Check it out.

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    This doesn't appear to make any attempt to answer the question. – Brian Towers Jan 1 at 16:33

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