4
[FEN "r6k/3q2bp/1p6/2pPp1p1/2P1QpP1/5P2/1P2R2P/2B3K1 w - - 0 1"]

Here Petrosian gives the following 3 step winning plan:

Stage 1: Tie down the black pieces to defense of the e pawn: 13.Bd2 Re8 14.Bc3 Qd6 15.Re1

Stage 2: Switch to the a file: 15..h6 Ra1 and then Ra7

Stage 3: Penetrate into the white squares.

Now what I don't understand is this: when he proceeds with stage 2 by bringing the rook to a file, isn't he removing one attacker of the e pawn? Now black's pieces will not be tied to the e pawn anymore. So, how is this plan any effective?

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    Note that step 1 is conducted in order to facilitate the takeover of the a-file. So it's not a goal in and of itself to tie down black to the defense of the e-pawn, it's rather a means to an end. But what is the game you're referring to? I don't recognize it, so maybe you could post a link to the game?
    – Scounged
    Dec 21 '20 at 9:19
  • @Scounged Thanks ,Here's the link:chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=1096161
    – bretlee
    Dec 21 '20 at 13:11
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when he proceeds with stage 2 by bringing the rook to a file, isn't he removing one attacker of the e pawn? Now black's pieces will not be tied to the e pawn anymore. So, how is this plan any effective?

Currently black controls the a file with the rook on a8. The whole point of step 1. "tie down black pieces defending e pawn" is to force the a8 rook to give up the a file to defend the e pawn with Re8. Only when that is accomplished can white take over the a file with Ra1. The whole point of having a multi step is achieving the last step. The earlier steps are only necessary because without them the last step cannot be forced.

1
  • Thanks @Brian Towers,Now I understand clearly
    – bretlee
    Dec 21 '20 at 13:14

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