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During an over the board tournament, an opponent frequently asked to see my scoresheet, stating that they had missed moves or otherwise messed up theirs. (They asked 5 or 6 times in a game with a time control of game in 25 minutes.) Trying to keep things friendly, I let them see my sheet. The first couple times I did not mind, but when it continued happening I found it annoying and distracting.

Thus the question: Am I obligated to let an opponent see my game record so they can make corrections to theirs?

Also, if I do show it to them, whose clock should be running as they make corrections?

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    Are you interested in USCF or FIDE rules? – D M Nov 13 '20 at 23:33
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    USCF for tournaments I'm likely to play in, but FIDE would be interesting too. – GreenMatt Nov 14 '20 at 1:04
  • I am not familiar with USCF rules. As I said in my answer, under FIDE rules, scoresheets are not required in a 25-minute game. I would have thought that: (1) If scoresheets are required, then your opponent should be penalised for not recording moves properly. (2) If scoresheets are not required, then your opponent should wait until the end of the game to update their scoresheet. – Brian Drake Nov 16 '20 at 13:26
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Am I obligated to let an opponent see my game record so they can make corrections to theirs?

According to USCF rule 15D3, it's suggested that you do so, but it's not mandatory unless the tournament director tells you to:

The opponent is urged to comply with such a request, but this is not mandatory. If the opponent denies the request, the player may stop both clocks and see a director. A director who agrees that the request is appropriate shall instruct the opponent to lend the player the scoresheet. The opponent may not refuse as all scoresheets belong to the organizers.

The TD will probably allow it, unless there's some reason not to. Excessive requests may be denied and may even be penalized, according to rule 15D4.

Also, if I do show it to them, whose clock should be running as they make corrections?

According to USCF rule 15D2:

The clock of the player making such a request is running and shall continue to run until the scoresheet has been returned.

Under FIDE rules, the time control in question would be a Rapid game. According to FIDE rule A.3.2, which applies to rapid games:

The player may at any time, when it is his move, ask the arbiter or his assistant to show him the scoresheet. This may be requested a maximum of five times in a game. More requests shall be considered as a distraction of the opponent.

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Anyone initiating communication with their opponent should do so on their own time. Initiating communication with an opponent on the opponent's time (barring common sense exceptions, such as to warn them that they didn't hit their clock) warrants a warning, and repeated instances a game loss.

If your opponent is using their time to correct their sheet, that's generally a good thing for you, but if it really annoys you more than the time advantage is worth, you can refuse.

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This answer is about the FIDE Laws of Chess effective from 1 January 2018.

There does not seem to be any explicit provision for a player updating their scoresheet using their opponent’s scoresheet, except where exactly one player has stopped recording moves due to low time (Article 8.5.2):

If only one player has not kept score under Article 8.4, he must, as soon as either flag has fallen, update his scoresheet completely before moving a piece on the chessboard. Provided it is that player’s move, he may use his opponent’s scoresheet, but must return it before making a move.

Note that:

  1. The player updating their scoresheet must have the move, so their clock should be running (assuming their opponent remembered to press it!).
  2. This would not apply to a 25 minute game (see below).

I would expect that requests to see the opponent’s scoresheet, or at least excessive requests, would be considered distracting. This is supported by the “rapid chess” rules, which would apply to a 25 minute game. See Article A.3.2:

The player may at any time, when it is his move, ask the arbiter or his assistant to show him the scoresheet. This may be requested a maximum of five times in a game. More requests shall be considered as a distraction of the opponent.

If asking the arbiter or their assistant six times in a game is distracting, then asking the opponent six times is definitely distracting.

You are definitely not obligated to let your opponent see your scoresheet if you don’t have one. In “rapid chess”, players do not have to maintain a scoresheet (Article A.2):

Players do not need to record the moves, but do not lose their rights to claims normally based on a scoresheet.

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