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[Event "the_meayhi vs. oxygen2020"]
[Site "Chess.com"]
[Date "2020-08-16"]
[White "the_meayhi"]
[Black "oxygen2020"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "810"]
[BlackElo "1032"]
[TimeControl "blitz"]
[Termination "the_meayhi won by resignation"]
[fen ""]

1. d4 d5 2. Bf4 c5 3. dxc5 e6 4. Bxb8 Rxb8 5. e3 Bxc5 6. Nc3 Ne7 7. Nf3 Bd6 8. Qd4 O-O 9. Bd3 a6 10. Qh4 g6 11. Ng5 h5 12. g4 Nf5 13. Bxf5 1-0

Despite the result of the game, te chess.com engine says that White blundered. It also says that one player was winning and blundered it away. What do those mean?

engine

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  • 1
    It means that your opponent was once winning, but played a bad move that made you win. – user24344 Aug 16 '20 at 11:26
  • 1
    @CitrusCornflakes It doesn't have to be your opponent. – Acccumulation Aug 17 '20 at 5:23
  • 1
    Consider that the text might just be a random phrase that's shown when the engine detects a move it considers a blunder. It might not have anything to do with a specific situation in your game. – Kakturus Aug 17 '20 at 15:27
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Your last move 13.Bxf5 leaves you with a much smaller advantage than 13.gxf5, that's what the engine is counting as a "blunder" (some of the previous moves have smaller mistakes, but none of them should be counted as "blunders")

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    As white blundered whats the continuation for black? For white lose some advantage – Lifeforbetter Aug 16 '20 at 15:44
  • 3
    @Lifeforbetter There are no continuation for black. Black is losing no matter what, but you could've win a piece which the engine considered a "better win". – null Aug 17 '20 at 5:00
  • But white still winning though @David – Lifeforbetter Jul 14 at 15:41
  • @Lifeforbetter Black should take hte bishop. Its position is still bad, but not as much as it would have been in case of 13.gxf5 – David Jul 15 at 11:43
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13.Bxf5?? is a blunder because 13.gxf5 wins a piece. In other words, by playing 13.gxf5! White has a winning game. When the computer detects a big change, like a change from an even or near even game to a winning/losing game, it considers the move that caused the change to be a blunder.

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