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I had started playing this game with Scandinavian Defense opening. How it is been denoted as French Advanced variation as of 3rd move. Please refer to the attached screen-shot.

enter image description here

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    Be cause you entered, by a different move order, into the advance variation of the french defense. – Olorin May 19 at 17:14
  • Thanks for the answer, I had just checked over & found an French Advanced Variation Main Line been met half by my third move, maybe it's the closure for Main Line determination or so. – Inc Operations May 19 at 17:25
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I apologize for posting a comment as an answer, but this is the only way for me to include diagrams, which I find helpful.

You have entered Advanced French defense by transposition.

After 1.e4 d5 2. e5 e6 3.d4 we get the following position:

[StartFlipped "0"]
[fen "rnbqkbnr/ppp2ppp/4p3/3pP3/3P4/8/PPP2PPP/RNBQKBNR b KQkq - 0 3"]

The usual way of reaching the above position is with 1.e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5

[StartFlipped "0"]
[fen "rnbqkbnr/ppp2ppp/4p3/3pP3/3P4/8/PPP2PPP/RNBQKBNR b KQkq - 0 3"]

Lichess was smart enough to figure this out.

| improve this answer | |
4

As explained in the fine answer by AlwaysLearningNewStuff, you have transposed into the Advanced French.

Such transpositions are common in chess. That's why, if you are assigning an opening to a game you would normally go backwards and base it on the last known theoretical position in that game.

Concerning the moves of that game. 2. e5 is objectively not the best move for white as it allows black a good version of the French defense.

More popular replies than 2....e6 are 2...c5 (with the idea to develop the bishop from c8 before playing e6) or an immediate 2....Bf5. In either case, black gets a French defense pawn structure but has solved the problem of having a weak light squared bishop.

| improve this answer | |
  • I have often had the privilege of playing Black in such a position. Most people under, say, 1800 are unfamiliar with the Scandanavian. – Joe May 20 at 15:43
  • Such transpositions are common in chess. That's why, if you are assigning an opening to a game you would normally go backwards and base it on the last known theoretical position in that game. <---------- very well explained, +1 – AlwaysLearningNewStuff May 20 at 15:44
  • Another opening also said to sometimes give a version of the French Defense is the Caro-Kann. See- 1. e4 c6 (the caro-kann) 2. d4 d5 3. e5 (the advance variation) Bf5. Here, as in contrast to the advanced French, the light square bishop is outside the pawn chain. However, black has wasted time by playing c6, since generally in the French & Caro, black goes for c5. In the line 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 Black gets to play c5 in one move, but in the Caro-Kann, c6 has already been played and a tempo wasted. After 2... Bf5 in your game, black both gets the bishop out and can play c5 in one go. – pulsar512b May 21 at 3:45

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