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I was surfing across Tim Krabbe’s website, as I usually do on occasion, and I found his article DE KOEWEITSE ONSTERFELIJKE," a very interesting tidbit. A game of 34 moves is mentioned in the last paragraph and notations for all of the moves are given. However, I do not understand them at all. There are strange letters for the pieces, such as P T, and D. K is understandable as the King. I suspect that P is for pawn.

Can anyone please explain to me what these symbols mean, and tell me what kind of notation variation that this is? A link to a site that explains it, such as its history, would also be helpful to have. I would also like it if you could put the game in the replayer so that I may better understand the notation.

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Can anyone please explain to me what these symbols mean?

These are the abbreviations for the pieces in Dutch. I believe they are almost the same as the German ones (with the exception of the knight = Springer (jumper) in German and = paard (horse) in Dutch (Pferd = horse in German), which are -

T = Turm (= Castle, Rook)
P = Pferd (= Horse, Knight)
L = Laufer (= Runner, Bishop)
K = Koenig (= King, King)
D = Dame (= Queen, Queen)

I would also like it if you could put the game in the replayer so that I may better understand the notation.

[fen ""]

1.g4 e5 2.Nh3 Ba3 3.bxa3 h5 4. Bb2 hxg4 5. Bc3 Rh4 6. Bd4 exd4 7. Nc3 dxc3 8. dxc3 g3 9. Qd3 Rb4 10. Nf4 g5 11. h4 f5 12. h5 d5 13. h6 Bd7 14. h7 g2 15. h8=B g1=R!! 16. Bd4 Ba4 17. Rh4 Rg3 18. Bg2 gxf4 19. Be3 fxe3 20. Be4 fxe4 21. fxe3 exd3 22. exd3 c5 23. Rc4 dxc4 24. dxc4 b5!! 25. cxb4 Qa5 26. cxb5 Na6 27. bxa5 O-O-O!! 28. bxa6 Rd4 29. exd4 Rb3 30. cxb3 Ne7 31. bxa4 Nd5 32. dxc5 Nb6 33. cxb6 Kb8 34. bxa7 Ka8
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    In German the knight is a Springer and notated as S, not a Pferd, as far as I know. But this is correct for Dutch. Apr 1 '19 at 13:19
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Looks like it's just algebraic notation using Dutch as the language, most likely given the author's nationality and that the rest of the article looks like Dutch - not the whole of the world speaks English! You can translate it yourself using the table at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Algebraic_notation_(chess)

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