3

Not a duplicate of, but inspired by: A position in which checkmate is forced (obligatory)

That question has a bit of variation, and my question is far more specific.

My answer to it was like this:

[FEN "RN2k1NR/P3P2P/3PPP2/4pBp1/4PbP1/3ppp2/p3p2p/rn2K1nr w - - 0 1"]

This is a position in which all possible moves, the only moves possible, are checkmates. They are forced in the sense that they are the only options. Their are 14 possible mating moves combined, and 10 mating pieces/pawns total (the rook mates are attirubuted to the knights.)

This position is clearly illegal, so I wonder what legal position, legally reachable, has the most possible forced checkmates is within the already given criteria.

Whether one side or both are used matters not: In the end the TOTAL amount of possible forced checkmates is what matters.

Their are two categories for this I suppose: Most moves and most pieces and pawns.

  • Perhaps you can rephrase it as "What is a postition with the largest number of legal moves, when all legal moves are checkmate?" – Dag Oskar Madsen Apr 3 at 10:58
  • That is not the question. It is about forced checkmates. That question you suggested has already been answered. – Rewan Demontay Apr 3 at 10:59
3

The answer to this has already been given as an answer in a related question. That answer was 50

[Title "Wolfgang Dittmann, Die Schwalbe 1967"]
[Site "https://timkr.home.xs4all.nl/chess2/diary_17.htm"]
[Date "2019.03.30"]
[Round "-"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "*"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "b2rQQQ1/3B1N1Q/n2K1k2/3P3Q/4P1Qp/5pNP/1R5b/B7 w - - 0 1"]

The position is taken from Tim Krabbe's website. According to Krabbe:

There are 14 mates by Rb2; 1 by e4; 8 by Qg4; 6 by Qh5; 5 by Qh7; 4 by Qg8; 3 by Qf8; 4 by Qe8 and 5 by Nf7, for a total of 50.

  • 3
    It is but ironic that that was my answer! – Rewan Demontay Apr 3 at 12:18
  • I had asked this question before I found that on Tim Krabb’s site. I also forget that I asked if until now! – Rewan Demontay Apr 3 at 12:18
  • The answer is 55 now! – Rewan Demontay May 10 at 11:33

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