1

The FIDE Rules for Swiss Systems state:

C.04.2 A It is not allowed to alter the correct pairings in favour of any player.

and then further state:

Where it can be shown that modifications of the original pairings were made to help a player achieve a norm or a direct title, a report may be submitted to the QC to initiate disciplinary measures through the Ethics Commission.

What I can get from this is that (for example) if my friend, who is one point away in the final round to achieve a title, is a player in a tournament, and I am the arbiter of that tournament, I can alter the pairings in such a way that he plays an 1100 player and have an easy title shot.

Is this what can be concluded from the above section of the rules? If not, what is meant by "modifications" there?

4

It says the exact opposite.

C.04.2 A It is not allowed to alter the correct pairings in favour of any player.

So no, you can't.

Where it can be shown that modifications of the original pairings were made to help a player achieve a norm or a direct title, a report may be submitted to the QC to initiate disciplinary measures through the Ethics Commission.

FIDE could try to punish the player or you.

  • Can you give an example of altering the pairings while keeping up with disciplinary measures? – Wais Kamal Jan 27 at 10:25
  • "Keeping up with disciplinary measures"? I don't get your question. – RemcoGerlich Jan 27 at 10:27
  • I mean, can you give an example of altering the pairings and it gets approved by FIDE? Put in another way, in what way can the arbiter alter the pairings without getting penalised? – Wais Kamal Jan 27 at 10:29
  • 1
    It happens that pairings are changed to prevent people from Israel and Iran to be paired with each other, as the Iranian player would face sanctions otherwise. But that's not actually legal, if a norm was involved then it would be problematic. The file format the FIDE accepts is a dump from sanctioned software and any changes to its algorithm are visible when loading the file, afaik. But I can't find examples right now. – RemcoGerlich Jan 27 at 10:31
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I mean, can you give an example of altering the pairings and it gets approved by FIDE? Put in another way, in what way can the arbiter alter the pairings without getting penalised?

OK, this is the scenario.

You are the chief arbiter of a norm tournament. It is the last round. One of the players has norm chances, say if he/she wins his/her last game against a player with a rating above a certain rating. The default time is 30 minutes.

After 30 minutes the opponent has not turned up and is defaulted. In these circumstances you should have some spare players who act as "fillers". These players do not play in the full tournament but are on standby in case something like this happens. In this case you may choose a "filler" who has a high enough rating for the norm to still be possible. This is a change to the original pairings and is acceptable.

As a side note this business of repairing in the case of a default is a tricky business. In general if you want to force the player to accept a new opponent then this must be stated in the terms and conditions for the tournament before the tournament starts. If this is not done then the player can refuse and must then be awarded the full point for the default. If it means a cash prize then obviously the player is going to take the point for a default.

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