6

I am looking for any collection of chess games of al-Suli or anyone medieval scholar's composition of games. Any resources would be appreciated.

5

Take a look at this page. I hope it helps..

  • While it is a great example of the particular game, I was actually looking forward to a whole collection. – Sniper Clown May 3 '13 at 20:47
1

While it's not yet in the public domain, H.J. Murray's A History of Chess can be found on Google Books, and contains a large number of constructed shatranj problems.

0

I have found quite a few websites when I Googled for Shatranj chess problems. Here is the link so you can go explore.

See the rules here on Wikipedia. Bishops represent the Alfils in all of the following diagrams, and queens represent Ferz.

One good site that I found has a section called "Chess Problems Of 1001 Years Ago ," which has a few problems in it. Here's a long one. It can also be found here.

[Title "The Water Wheel, Al-Suli, 930, White To Move And Win"]
[FEN "rQ2nbbR/P5p1/pkp1pn2/1Pr2B2/2Pq2Pp/PN1P4/1N3p2/1KB3R1 w K - 0 1"]

1. Na4+ Kb7 2. Na5+ Kc8 3. Nb6+ Kd8 4. Nb7+ Ke7 5. Nc8+ Kf7 6. Nd8+ Kg6 7. Ne7+ Kg5 8. Nf7+ Kf4 9. Ng6+ Kf3 10. Ng5+ Ke2 11. Nf4+ Kd2 12. Nf3+ Kc3 13. Ne2+ Kb3 14. Nfxd4+ Ka4 15. Nc3+ Ka5 16. Nb3+ Kb6 17. Na4+ Kb7 18. Nbxc5+ Kc8 19. Nb6 Kd8 20. Nb7+ Ke7 21. Nc8+ Kf7 22. Nd8+ Kg6 23. Ne7+ Kg5 24. Nf7+ Kf4 25. Ng6+ Kf3 26. Ng5+  Ke2 27. Nf4+ Kd2 28. Nf3+ Kc3 29. Ne2+ Kb3 30. Nd2+ Ka4 30. Nc3+ Ka5 31. Nc3+ Ka5 32. Nb3+ Kb6 33. Na4+ Kb7 34. Na5+ Kc8 35. Nb6+ Kd8 36. Nxc6#

When I saw this question, my mind remembered a puzzle that Tim Krabbe showed on his website here in Journal Entry #146. An easy way to make this into a problem under modern rules is to simply add a pawn on g3, as Tim Krabbe notes.

[Title "Mate in 6ms. 791, Casanatense Library, Rome, 15th Century"]
[FEN "4k3/4P3/4P3/4P3/4P3/4P3/4P2B/R1N1K3 w Q - 0 1"]

1. Nb3 Kxe7 2. Ra8 Kxe6 3. Ra7 Kxe5 4. Ra6 Kxe45. Ra5 Kxe3 6. Re5#

Enjoy!

Lastly, the Wikipedia page for Shatranj gives the following puzzle.

[Title "Mate in 5, Dilaram Problem, c. 10th century"]
[FEN "1r4k1/8/5PP1/8/K1n3NR/7B/1r6/7R w KQkq - 0 1"]    

The solution, which cannot be shown, is this: 1. Rh8+ Kxh8 2. Bf5+ Kg8 3. Rh8+ Kxh8 4. g7+ Kg8 5. Nh6#.

  • 1
    Remember that the piece on h3 is a fil or alfil. Stockfish has taken it for a bishop. According to Popeye, the shortest mate is in 6: 1 Rh8+ Kxh8 2 Af5+ Rh2 3 Rxh2+ Kg8 4 Rh8+ Kxh8 5 g7+ Kg8 6 Nh6# OR 4 Nh6+ Kf8 5 g7+ Ke8 6 g8=Q/R# – Rosie F Jul 2 '19 at 14:09
  • 1
    And I in turn should've remembered that in shatranj promotions are only to fers (and queens don't exist) so my dual line with g8=Q/R doesn't apply. So the problem is sound after all. – Rosie F Jul 2 '19 at 14:24

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