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I just started preparing Endgame using Dvoretsky Endgame Manual. I am wondering if there are more books online about Pawn Endgames that I can use side by side either as an additional study material or solving book. Thanks.

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Chess Endgame Training by Bernd Rosen features 16 sections on different types of endgame, with 5 of them focused on pawn endgames. Each section has around 16 puzzles to solve featuring different themes : zugzwang, space advantage, pawn break, and so on. Some were quite tricky to solve (I'm ~1850 FIDE) and the author's lines and insights were helpful, even though I already knew basic endgames.

FYI, I haven't read Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual so I can't guarantee you there's no redundancy, but I'd say it's unlikely. Rosen also divided material by section and within sections, which helps focus on particular themes for practice.

  • Thanks for your recommendation @Umlin. I'll be sure to check this out. – Arun J Jul 18 '18 at 8:16
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Reuben Fine's Basic Chess Endings is a classic - Benko's revision corrects errors in the early edition

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If you can find it The Final Countdown by Hajenius and Van Riemsdijk, also Muller and Lamprecht with Secrets of Pawn Endings.

The Final Countdown is a little book from the 90s that discusses pawn endings and things like key squares, and corresponding squares. It has about 50 exercises at the end.

Secrets of Pawn Endings is very comprehensive and has exercises with solutions for every chapter. It covers all sorts of concepts and also goes into different thinking methods.

An older book is Comprehensive Chess Endings, volume 4. I haven't read it so I don't know what it contained in the way of exercises, but Averbakh's series was well regarded when it was in print.

I have Fishbein's book, but I haven't read it. If I had to choose one, I'd say you probably can't go wrong with Secrets of Pawn Endings.

  • Comprehensive Chess Endings volume 4 looks great. I just checked the book. – Arun J Jul 19 '18 at 17:06
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Encyclopedia of Chess Endings, Volume 1, Pawn Endings by Aleksandar Matanovic

The ECO books are thick and considered the standard reference books for all phases of chess. They have a wide range of very specific books from the pawn ending you seek to anything like Rook vs. Minor Piece Endings, or Queen and Pawn endings. The drawback of these books is that they don't have detailed explanations of the lines, but they are meant to be comprehensive.

  • FYI: this answer has been flagged (I suspect automatically) as low quality. It would be better if you could tell why this is a good choice. – Glorfindel Jul 18 '18 at 19:35
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Alex Fishbein's King and Pawn Endgames has made me feel comfortable seeing only pawns on the board.

The book is filled with almost 300 positions.

I have only gone through the first 60 and I already feel ages ahead of my ability. No longer do I have to look at a King and Pawns only endgame in horror. I actually have ideas about what to do (king in the middle, forcing the enemy king onto a bad square, gaining tempo, etc.)

I have brilliantly developed an intuition for the king. I tend to move my king towards the middle in late middlegames.

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