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I have a slow connection and I always face connection problems when playing bullet games. My lag (according to lichess) averages 400 milliseconds. However, when I ping Google's IP address 8.8.8.8 it shows a lag of 245 milliseconds.

So why do these two numbers differ? Are chess moves larger in size than what is needed to ping an IP address?

closed as off-topic by Brian Towers, Phonon, Herb Wolfe, SmallChess, Tony Ennis Feb 20 '18 at 3:13

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about chess within the scope defined in the help center." – Brian Towers, Phonon, Herb Wolfe, SmallChess, Tony Ennis
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    Not an expert in this topic, but I believe this time has nothing to do with the size of data you sent, but rather with the distance of the server. Perhaps google's server is just closer to you than lichess's. Also I believe this is not really a chess question. – user1583209 Feb 19 '18 at 20:16
  • @user1583209 Well, how many chess questions are there on this site anyway? – David Jul 8 at 8:51
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The move itself is small (depending if the Chess-software is sending only the move or additional data (e.g. a FEN of the position)) this is sginificantly less than 150 bytes.

Depending on how moves are transfered one moves takes about 500 to 800 bytes. You should check the size of the package sent by your ping: If you ping 8.8.8.8. you should get something like

64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_seq=0 ttl=60 time=12.638 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_seq=1 ttl=60 time=12.814 ms
64 bytes from 8.8.8.8: icmp_seq=2 ttl=60 time=15.309 ms

The lag might change during daytime or even seconds depending on the load or setup of your provider.

More important seems to me that the ping to 8.8.8.8 lags with you for 245ms - this is way too much (I e.g. get 12ms). So probably your provider is too slow.

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