8

I have been trying to solve this for a long time, but can't find a solution. How can white force a checkmate in 2 moves?

1R6/4p3/2pkB3/4n1N1/8/1N2K1B1/8/8 w - - 0 1
5
  • 3
    If only there was a way to stop 1... c5 ... May 25 '17 at 14:22
  • You can solve a mate in two problem by trying every move for White.
    – bof
    May 25 '17 at 21:32
  • @bof For this reason mate in two problems are actually quite good for practicing your calculation skills. I think Laszlo Polgar used to give such problems to his daughters when they were young. May 25 '17 at 22:22
  • 1
    On good problems, it is rare that the first move is check.
    – Tony Ennis
    May 25 '17 at 23:07
  • I dont think the OP is asking for mate in two moves; hes asking to find, within two moves, a forced mating variation (look at the wording!) Regardless, @Glorfindel has found a mate in two. May 26 '17 at 1:21
10

Ask yourself: what would Black do if he were to move? After 1... Kc7, 2. Bxe5 is mate. His other option is 1... c5, threatening to escape with 2... Kc6.

The solution:

1. Nc5! blocks the c-pawn. Black gets the additional option of 1... Kxc5, but after that, 2. Ne4 is mate.

(I can post an interactive version, but that doesn't work with spoilers. And it's a good visualization exercise.)

8
  • There's a second solution . . .
    – pokep
    May 26 '17 at 16:29
  • @pokep maybe; I didn't look any further than this one. If there is one, you can (should) post it as a second answer.
    – Glorfindel
    May 27 '17 at 10:31
  • >! Looks like 1.Nd4 Kc5 (or c5) 2.Ne4 is checkmate
    – Rick G
    May 28 '17 at 14:52
  • @RickG after 1. Nd4 c5 2. Ne4 the black king can escape (temporarily) to c7.
    – Glorfindel
    May 28 '17 at 16:25
  • @Glorfindel yup, missed that!
    – Rick G
    May 30 '17 at 2:09

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