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I am interested in developing an online interactive course based on the book Bobby Fischer Teaches Chess. Can anyone advise me on the copyright issues involved?

It makes a difference for beginning chess players whether this material is available online as interactve exercises or remains stuck in a printed book. It is about promoting chess at the lowest levels. It might be adopted by school programs to help increase the level of chess among beginners.

I know a chess coach who is creating an online course for beginners for teachers in primary schools because chess is coming to schools nowadays. I wonder why he needs to be coming up with his own exercises rather than use this excellent material.

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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is mostly related to copyright law, rather than chess. – Jester Jan 12 '16 at 23:00
  • It makes a difference for beginning chess players whether this material is available online as interactve exercises or remains stuck in a printed book. It is about promoting chess at the lowest levels. It might be adopted by school programs to help increase the level of chess among beginners. – DrCapablasker Jan 13 '16 at 7:05
  • I completely understand the advantages. However, your quedtion asks for advice on legal aspects, only. That is something you are unlikely to find here, given thst there are no special laws regarding chess books. – Jester Jan 13 '16 at 17:44
  • If you want to discuss how to best make an online course from a book, feel free to edit the question or ask a new one. – Jester Jan 13 '16 at 17:47
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    My feeling is that coming up with similar (but original) exercises as in "Bobby Fischer teaches chess", should take one day at most. It is rather simple stuff. Doesn't make much sense to me to take a copyright risk, just to avoid one day of work. – BlindKungFuMaster Jan 14 '16 at 11:36

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