6

I'm a 2000 Fide player and I played an interesting opening game last sunday.

It was a King's Indian Samisch (I was playing white) and my opponent played the c5 gambit. That was the first time I saw this move.


      [FEN ""]
      [StartPly "11"]

      1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 O-O 6.Be3 c5 

I accepted the gambit and was not happy with my position. Both sides played not so accurate moves and I ended up winning a piece.

But analyzing the game, either Stockfish and I seems to not like the position.

Here is what happened


      [FEN ""]
      [StartPly "11"]

      1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 5.f3 O-O 6.Be3 c5 7. dxc5 dxc5 8. Qxd8 Rxd8 9. Bxc5 Nc6 10.Be2 Nd7 11.Be3 Nde5 (11... Bxc3!? 12. bxc3 Nb6 13. c5 Na4) 12.Rd1?! (12. Nd5! e6 13.Nc7 Rb8 14.Rd1) Rxd1 13. Kxd1 Na5 14.Nd5 e6?? (14... Nexc4) 15.Nc7

Does white have better lines when accepting the gambit? How do you play against c5 (d5 for Benoni like positions or let the status quo hoping for sort of maroczy bind, or something else?

  • I usually go for d5 in these positions and I ended up liking the positions that arise. That was what my chess instructor recommended me when I was a kid but I haven't really looked at the theory since then. – A. A. Dec 8 '15 at 19:45
  • A couple of months ago there was a similar question, from black's perspective: chess.stackexchange.com/questions/9659/… After 6....c5, white should probably go for 7.d5 or 7.Nge2 Nc6 8.d5. – Maxwell86 Dec 9 '15 at 8:13
  • 1
    Maybe accepting the sacrifice is still worth a try. In a recent grandmaster game, Bruzon-Pichot, white took the pawn and went on to win the game: en.chessbase.com/post/carlos-torre-open-snowless-winter-1-2 – Maxwell86 Jan 8 '16 at 9:02
2

I remember reading somewhere in an opening book that the c5 line against the Saemisch is the primary reason why the Saemisch has stopped being popular among the elite. Moreover, it is recommended for black in two repertoire books on the King's Indian Defense: one by Bologan and one by Dejan Bojkov.

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