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I have been looking at corresponding squares recently.

It can be pretty hard to visually calculate and imagine them in your mind.

What I was wondering, would you ever be allowed to draw your plans on paper? I know in tournaments you are allowed pen & paper for your moves, could you scribble on that or under what circumstances would this not be allowed? I would have assumed in world championships you would not be allowed to do this. Is my assumption correct and what about club level / school players etc?

Example of what I mean by calculation:
http://www.chess.com/forum/view/chess-mentor/tricky-chess-problem-elo1700---corresponding-squares?ncc=3

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    I don't think so. GM W.So recently forfeited in the US championship for doing that. – SmallChess Nov 4 '15 at 23:01
  • Thanks. What about club level then ... I've never heard of rules at e.g. school level and I never played in a club – z0mbi3 Nov 4 '15 at 23:01
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    Someone else can give you a full answer but this not allowed in FIDE rules. Local competition might follow other rules. This is generally considered as cheating because your opponent doesn't do that. Remember your opponent also need to visualise the position, so it's fair. – SmallChess Nov 4 '15 at 23:04
  • I agree about fair and no cheating. Was just wondering if even both sides could be allowed to do so. Even if they perhaps agree on it? Or is it strictly not allowed (could anyone elaborate on which competitions etc would disallow this)? – z0mbi3 Nov 4 '15 at 23:39
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This is never allowed in an actual, over-the-board tournament.

National chess federations ban analysis notes, and local chess organization follow their national rules for rating.

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  • Sounds good to me - thanks. Will allow until tomorrow for any comments and then mark it as correct if there was no objections. – z0mbi3 Nov 5 '15 at 1:02

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