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I've been learning chess for a while, and I’ve tested my skills in online chess. I make lots of blunders in my games, but people who I ask can't seem to see them, including myself.

Here is a recent game of mine that I wish for analysis on so I may improve my skills.

[Event "4444 vs Anonymous"]
[Site "multiplayerchess.com"]
[Date "2015.08.10"]
[Round "1"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "4444"]
[Black "Anonymous"]

[FEN ""]
1. e4 e5 2. d3 Bc5 3. Ne2 d6 4. Nbc3 f5 5. d4 exd4 6. Nxd4 fxe4 7. Bb5+ c6 8. Ba4 Bxd4 9. Qxd4 Nf6 10. Bg5 O-O 11. O-O h6 12. Bb3+ d5 13. Bh4 Be6 14. Qb4 b6 15. Rad1 c5 16. Qb5 Qd7 17. Qxd7 Bxd7 18. Nxd5 Kh8 19. Nxf6 gxf6 20. Rd6 Bc6 21. Bd5 Bxd5 22. Rxd5 f5 23. Rfd1 Nc6 24. Rd7 Nd4 25. Be7 Rfe8 26. Bf6+ Kg8 27. Rg7+ Kf8 28. Rh7 Kg8 29. Rg7+ Kf8 30. c3 1-0

Black lost on time, ending the match.

  • 1
    The final position must be very good for white, so why 0-1? – Dag Oskar Madsen Aug 11 '15 at 13:14
  • I don't understand why White resigned either. Black has no forced win in this position, and after the N moves, White should eventually be able to double rooks on the 7th rank, a very powerful alignment. – CConero Aug 11 '15 at 13:22
  • 1
    I suspect a loss on time... – Ray Aug 11 '15 at 15:38
  • It appears that you lost on time control, so the issue is not really with your moves but with your time control. Of course, it depends what time controls you were playing here. Perhaps you should play a longer time control so that you can develop your tactical skills. Positionally and strategically, you played well. But you missed many opportunities to gain material in the center against the d and e pawns. As a result, your opponent attacked your queen vigorously. This likely drained the time on your clock. – mmainville Apr 23 '19 at 14:16
  • Move your pieces when they are under attack! – David Apr 24 '19 at 9:44
2
[Title "Game analysis"]

[FEN ""]
1. e4 e5 2. d3 Bc5 3. Ne2 { I prefer Nf3 here, it is more active} d6 4. Nbc3 f5 5. d4 exd4 6. Nxd4 fxe4 7. Bb5+? {Waste of time, Black easily defends while consolidating extra pawn} c6 8. Ba4 Bxd4? {Relinquishing bishop pair, playing twice with the developed piece, improves opponent's development} 9. Qxd4 Nf6 10. Bg5 O-O 11. O-O (11.O-O-O!? $40) 11...h6? (11...d5 $15) 12. Bb3+ d5 13. Bh4 (13.Bxf6!? Qxf6 14.Qxf6 Rxf6 15.Nxe4 Rf8 16.Nd6 $14) 13...Be6 14. Qb4? (14.Nxe4! dxe4 (14...Nxe4?? 15.Bxd8 +-) 15.Bxe6+ $16) 14... b6 15. Rad1?! (15.Nxe4!) 15...c5 16. Qb5 Qd7 17. Qxd7 Bxd7 18. Nxd5 Kh8 19. Nxf6?! (19.Nc7+- ) 19...gxf6 20. Rd6 Bc6 21. Bd5?! (21.Bxf6+) 21...Bxd5 22. Rxd5 f5 23. Rfd1 Nc6 24. Rd7 Nd4 25. Be7 (25.c3) 25...Rfe8 26. Bf6+ Kg8 27. Rg7+ Kf8 28. Rh7 Kg8 29. Rg7+ Kf8 30. c3+- {White has decisive advantage. He will penetrate with the rooks on the 7th rank and eventually mate Black.} 0-1

If you do not understand symbols behind moves, go to this link.

Some advices:

  • Improve your opening repertoire, what I saw is very risky -> it might cost you in the future if you continue to open this way;
  • Work on tactics, that Nxe4 blow was obvious;
  • Find a book/online tutorial/... on basics of opening play -> you wasted tempo several times without any good reason to do so;
  • Generally speaking, you played well for your level of skill -> keep improving, you have good prospects in becoming good player.

If you need further help leave a comment. Best regards.

| improve this answer | |
  • Well, I kept playing these kind of game every time, always sacrificing to open up my opponent for checkmates, but I've been making lots of blunders 'cause of this. Maybe I'm too engrossed with Fischer's play. – 4444 Aug 12 '15 at 1:45
  • There is absolutelly no need to improve openings, just stop dropping pieces – David Apr 24 '19 at 9:44

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