4 several very small tweaks to a very good answer
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So your only chance is to find an opening that has the least amount of theory to learn, but be warned--all good defenses against 1.d4 have lots of theory worked out to the move 30 and sometimes beyond. Just because the number of branches is small it does not mean that the sub-variations are short.

Yet another problem with 1.d4 and an important one--I use this all the time to quickly demolish opponents with weak opening knowledge--most of the good defenses to 1.d4 can be dodged by careful move order transposition!

Your problem is far more complex because of this. Currently Nimzo-Indian scores very well against 1.d4 but can be dodged if White plays 3.Nf3 instead of 3.Nc3 then. Then you are forced to adopt Queen's gambit declined or Queen's Indian defense and both of those openings give slight advantage to White, which severely reduces your chances to win.

You can play both openings against anything White throws at you, whether it is 1.c4/1.Nf3 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3/g3 or whatever. Still, if White is a weaker player he can exploit the KingsKing's Indian defense to exchange early and try to draw--he has good chances to fulfill this goal as things currently stand.

Queen's gambit declined is also immune to transpositions and has that benefit that its exchange variation is everything but a draw! It leads to some exciting positions and both opponents must know what they are doing. It is highly theoretical but the number of lines is fairly low. They are not razor-sharp but you need to know them or else you will be "smothered to death". Black usually parries WhiteWhite's threats first, and "shoots" later. Most of the time you get the king side attack but it usually draws. Queen's gambit declined lines without the exchange variation are also theoretical, but the number of lines is relatively small there as well.

If you play Caro-Kann/French defense/Alekhine's defense... thanthen go with the QGD, but if you play the Sicilian/Ruy Lopez/1...e5 in general thanthen go for KID since the pawn structure is similar. That way you will shorten the amount of time you need to learn the opening and its middle-game.

So your only chance is to find an opening that has the least amount of theory to learn but be warned-all good defenses against 1.d4 have lots of theory worked out to the move 30 and sometimes beyond. Just because the number of branches is small it does not mean that the sub-variations are short.

Yet another problem with 1.d4 and an important one-I use this all the time to quickly demolish opponents with weak opening knowledge-most of the good defenses to 1.d4 can be dodged by careful move order transposition!

Your problem is far more complex because of this. Currently Nimzo-Indian scores very well against 1.d4 but can be dodged if White plays 3.Nf3 instead of 3.Nc3 then you are forced to adopt Queen's gambit declined or Queen's Indian defense and both of those openings give slight advantage to White, which severely reduces your chances to win.

You can play both openings against anything White throws at you, whether it is 1.c4/1.Nf3 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3/g3 or whatever. Still, if White is weaker player he can exploit Kings Indian defense to exchange early and try to draw-he has good chances to fulfill this goal as things currently stand.

Queen's gambit declined is also immune to transpositions and has that benefit that its exchange variation is everything but a draw! It leads to some exciting positions and both opponents must know what they are doing. It is highly theoretical but number of lines is fairly low. They are not razor-sharp but you need to know them or else you will be "smothered to death". Black usually parries White threats first, and "shoots" later. Most of the time you get the king side attack but it usually draws. Queen's gambit declined lines without the exchange variation are also theoretical, but number of lines is relatively small there as well.

If you play Caro-Kann/French defense/Alekhine's defense... than go with the QGD, but if you play the Sicilian/Ruy Lopez/1...e5 in general than go for KID since the pawn structure is similar. That way you will shorten the amount of time you need to learn the opening and its middle-game.

So your only chance is to find an opening that has the least amount of theory to learn, but be warned--all good defenses against 1.d4 have lots of theory worked out to move 30 and sometimes beyond. Just because the number of branches is small does not mean that the sub-variations are short.

Yet another problem with 1.d4 and an important one--I use this all the time to quickly demolish opponents with weak opening knowledge--most of the good defenses to 1.d4 can be dodged by careful move order transposition!

Your problem is far more complex because of this. Currently Nimzo-Indian scores very well against 1.d4 but can be dodged if White plays 3.Nf3 instead of 3.Nc3. Then you are forced to adopt Queen's gambit declined or Queen's Indian defense and both of those openings give slight advantage to White, which severely reduces your chances to win.

You can play both openings against anything White throws at you, whether it is 1.c4/1.Nf3 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3/g3 or whatever. Still, if White is a weaker player he can exploit the King's Indian defense to exchange early and try to draw--he has good chances to fulfill this goal as things currently stand.

Queen's gambit declined is also immune to transpositions and has that benefit that its exchange variation is everything but a draw! It leads to some exciting positions and both opponents must know what they are doing. It is highly theoretical but the number of lines is fairly low. They are not razor-sharp but you need to know them or else you will be "smothered to death". Black usually parries White's threats first, and "shoots" later. Most of the time you get the king side attack but it usually draws. Queen's gambit declined lines without the exchange variation are also theoretical, but the number of lines is relatively small there as well.

If you play Caro-Kann/French defense/Alekhine's defense... then go with the QGD, but if you play the Sicilian/Ruy Lopez/1...e5 in general then go for KID since the pawn structure is similar. That way you will shorten the amount of time you need to learn the opening and its middle-game.

3 deleted 18 characters in body
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Your problem is far more complex because of this. Currently Nimzo-Indian scores very well against 1.d4 but can be dodged if White plays 3.Nf3 instead of 13.Nc3 thanthen you are forced to adopt Queen's gambit declined or Queen's Indian defense and both of those openings give slight advantage to White, which severely reduces your chances to win.

Hopefully this answer will help you to solve your complex problem.

Best regards.

Your problem is far more complex because of this. Currently Nimzo-Indian scores very well against 1.d4 but can be dodged if White plays 3.Nf3 instead of 1.Nc3 than you are forced to adopt Queen's gambit declined or Queen's Indian defense and both of those openings give slight advantage to White, which severely reduces your chances to win.

Hopefully this answer will help you to solve your complex problem.

Best regards.

Your problem is far more complex because of this. Currently Nimzo-Indian scores very well against 1.d4 but can be dodged if White plays 3.Nf3 instead of 3.Nc3 then you are forced to adopt Queen's gambit declined or Queen's Indian defense and both of those openings give slight advantage to White, which severely reduces your chances to win.

Hopefully this answer will help you to solve your complex problem.

2 edited body
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You can play both openings against anything White throws at you, whether it is 1.c4/1.Nf3 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3/g3 or whatever. Still, if White is weaker player he can exploit Kings IIndianIndian defense to exchange early and try to draw-he has good chances to fulfill this goal as things currently stand.

To make the choice between these two, you should see what type of pawn structures you play against 1.e4 and base your choice on that:

You can play both openings against anything White throws at you, whether it is 1.c4/1.Nf3 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3/g3 or whatever. Still, if White is weaker player he can exploit Kings IIndian defense to exchange early and try to draw-he has good chances to fulfill this goal as things currently stand.

To make the choice between these two, you should see what type of pawn structures you play against .e4 and base your choice on that:

You can play both openings against anything White throws at you, whether it is 1.c4/1.Nf3 or 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3/g3 or whatever. Still, if White is weaker player he can exploit Kings Indian defense to exchange early and try to draw-he has good chances to fulfill this goal as things currently stand.

To make the choice between these two, you should see what type of pawn structures you play against 1.e4 and base your choice on that:

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