4 deleted 88 characters in body
source | link

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish, or simply use lichess). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and lichess (e.g. on lichess you can freely analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.comchess24.com, which quite often also publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).  

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and lichess (e.g. on lichess you can freely analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).  

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish, or simply use lichess). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and lichess (e.g. on lichess you can freely analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chess24.com, which quite often also publish educational articles.

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

3 added 1 character in body
source | link

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and chess.comlichess (e.g. on chess.comlichess you can freely analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and chess.com (e.g. on chess.com you can analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and lichess (e.g. on lichess you can freely analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

2 replaced http://chess.stackexchange.com/ with https://chess.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the resultthe result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and chess.com (e.g. on chess.com you can analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and chess.com (e.g. on chess.com you can analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

Not to diminish anything from the other answers, below's a list of things (by no means exhaustive) you could try:

  • Solving puzzles to improve your tactics and general understanding of the game. It suffices to just google "chess puzzles" and you'll find plenty of resources to get started with. Keep solving them on a regular basis. (Note that you can be specific with puzzles based on your needs, e.g., search for "endgame chess puzzles").

  • Read chess books: there are many freely available books online, but generally chess books are quite affordable. For recommendations, just search for "chess books" here on chess SE, here's the result.

  • Use an engine (install a simple editor that handles uci chess engines, then set up your engine, e.g., Stockfish). Learning how to use an engine to analyse your games (or other games that you study) is one of the best resources, it really cannot be emphasized enough. Every game you play, just run it quickly through an engine, and find out about your inaccuracies (specially the common mistakes you tend to make, the engine will bring them to your attention if you use it regularly to study played games).

  • Play online chess on a regular basis: whatever time control you may prefer, although you will find the practice to be more fruitful if you tend towards longer time controls (10 mins, 15... or with increment). chess24.com and chess.com (e.g. on chess.com you can analyze your games on the cloud without having to store them locally and run your own engine) are two very famous/stable platform to play on these days.

  • Youtube: there are many strong chess players that record their online playing along with commentary on the moves-openings etc. I personally find these generally very insightful, as they often bring ideas to your attention that you'd never thought of in that way before. A couple that come to mind: chess24 youtube channel (where you'll find videos from GM Peter Svidler, GM Jan Gustafsson, to name a few). chessexplained youtube channel (IM Christof Sielecki is a very logical player, almost always he has a concrete idea for his moves, highly recommended). There are many others of course, try to find one you relate to better.

  • Follow chess news: it will encourage you to follow top player's recent games on a regular basis, and also chess news platforms such as chessvibes.com and chessbase.com quite often publish educational articles (on endgames, openings etc).

  • The list can go on... Just note that these ideas are not exclusive, try to come up with your routine and cover the mentioned elements to the extent possible. And whatever you decide, make sure not to limit yourself to one source, try some options and stick with those that fit better with your level and style of play.

1
source | link