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Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board. Note that Black's light-squared bishop is somewhat "bad," so try to trade one of your knights for his DARK squared bishop.

One way to try to do this is to move your c3 knight to a4, chasing the Black Queen. Your followup threats are a3, b4, and Nc5. If Black exchanges knights and you recapture with the b pawn, the pawn structures make both of Black's bishops "somewhat bad."

Black can counter this threat by moving c5, offering the exchange of his c pawn for your d pawn. You gladly accept because this isolates Black's d pawn and gives your f3 knight a fine outpost on d4 (see the diagram in ETD's answer).

Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board. Note that Black's light-squared bishop is somewhat "bad," so try to trade one of your knights for his DARK squared bishop.

Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board. Note that Black's light-squared bishop is somewhat "bad," so try to trade one of your knights for his DARK squared bishop.

One way to try to do this is to move your c3 knight to a4, chasing the Black Queen. Your followup threats are a3, b4, and Nc5. If Black exchanges knights and you recapture with the b pawn, the pawn structures make both of Black's bishops "somewhat bad."

Black can counter this threat by moving c5, offering the exchange of his c pawn for your d pawn. You gladly accept because this isolates Black's d pawn and gives your f3 knight a fine outpost on d4 (see the diagram in ETD's answer).

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Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board. Note that Black's light-squared bishop is somewhat "bad," so try to trade one of your knights for his DARK squared bishop.

Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board.

Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board. Note that Black's light-squared bishop is somewhat "bad," so try to trade one of your knights for his DARK squared bishop.

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Actually this is a pretty interesting position.

You have two "pawn islands" (Capablanca's term) to three for Black. One of them is an isolated rook pawn, two of them are "hanging" c and d pawns. Black's king side pawns are doubled. You have an open c file on your side to attack Black's backward c pawn.

Try to keep your pawns on dark squares to give your light-squared bishop as much mobility as possible to attack Black's pawn on the light squares.

Black's only advantage is a the bishop pair, but that's not much of an advantage with so many pawns on the board.