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What I was taught was that a king and two connected passed pawns was "drawable" if the pawns were both on the SIXTH rank, with the pawnholder to move. Assuming that the two kings and rook were all in a position to support/oppose the pawns.

If the pawn are both on the seventh rank, you might be able to win by "queening" one of them. Unless the opponent can sacrifice the rook for BOTH pawns.

In your case, your pawns were on the fourth rank, not far advanced enough to be "threatening," giving the rook too much time (and space to maneuver).

Pawns gain value the further advanced they are. A protected passed pawn on the sixth rank is worth TWO points (not one) and two connected passed pawns are worth more than four points because of the "synergy," that is, about a rook.

A protected passed pawn on the seventh rank is worth about three points, because the opponent will have to give up at least a minor piece to prevent it from queening.

What I was taught was that a king and two connected passed pawns was "drawable" if the pawns were both on the SIXTH rank, with the pawnholder to move.

If the pawn are both on the seventh rank, you might be able to win by "queening" one of them. Unless the opponent can sacrifice the rook for BOTH pawns.

In your case, your pawns were on the fourth rank, not far advanced enough to be "threatening," giving the rook too much time (and space to maneuver).

Pawns gain value the further advanced they are. A protected passed pawn on the sixth rank is worth TWO points (not one) and two connected passed pawns are worth more than four points because of the "synergy," that is, about a rook.

A protected passed pawn on the seventh rank is worth about three points, because the opponent will have to give up at least a minor piece to prevent it from queening.

What I was taught was that a king and two connected passed pawns was "drawable" if the pawns were both on the SIXTH rank, with the pawnholder to move. Assuming that the two kings and rook were all in a position to support/oppose the pawns.

If the pawn are both on the seventh rank, you might be able to win by "queening" one of them. Unless the opponent can sacrifice the rook for BOTH pawns.

In your case, your pawns were on the fourth rank, not far advanced enough to be "threatening," giving the rook too much time (and space to maneuver).

Pawns gain value the further advanced they are. A protected passed pawn on the sixth rank is worth TWO points (not one) and two connected passed pawns are worth more than four points because of the "synergy," that is, about a rook.

A protected passed pawn on the seventh rank is worth about three points, because the opponent will have to give up at least a minor piece to prevent it from queening.

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What I was taught was that a king and two connected passed pawns was "drawable" if the pawns were both on the SIXTH rank, with the pawnholder to move.

If the pawn are both on the seventh rank, you might be able to win by "queening" one of them. Unless the opponent can sacrifice the rook for BOTH pawns.

In your case, your pawns were on the fourth rank, not far advanced enough to be "threatening," giving the rook too much time (and space to maneuver).

Pawns gain value the further advanced they are. A protected passed pawn on the sixth rank is worth TWO points (not one) and two connected passed pawns are worth more than four points because of the "synergy," that is, about a rook.

A protected passed pawn on the seventh rank is worth about three points, because the opponent will have to give up at least a minor piece to prevent it from queening.