2 Expansion. Added some context.
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Which book? Assuming a GMGrandmaster wrote it... Well, here are the names of some GMsGrandmasters from the 70s1970s: Fischer. Spassky. Tal. Smyslov. Kortchnoi. Geller. Larsen. Petrosian. Botvinnik... I

I think those men, and men like those men, still have the ability to impart lessons.

If you can stand descriptive notation, books from the 70s1970s can still teach. And chances are, there are addenda on the web that call out faulty variations.

So it depends on the price. If these are $30US$30 each, and you are interested only in chess value (not the look/feel of the old tome) then perhaps a modern book is more cost effective.

Which book? Assuming a GM wrote it... Well, here are the names of some GMs from the 70s: Fischer. Spassky. Tal. Smyslov. Kortchnoi. Geller. Larsen. Petrosian. Botvinnik... I think those men, and men like those men, still have the ability to impart lessons.

If you can stand descriptive notation, books from the 70s can still teach. And chances are, there are addenda on the web that call out faulty variations.

So it depends on the price. If these are $30 each, and you are interested only in chess value (not the look/feel of the old tome) then perhaps a modern book is more cost effective.

Which book? Assuming a Grandmaster wrote it... Well, here are the names of some Grandmasters from the 1970s:

I think those men, and men like those men, still have the ability to impart lessons.

If you can stand descriptive notation, books from the 1970s can still teach. And chances are, there are addenda on the web that call out faulty variations.

So it depends on the price. If these are US$30 each, and you are interested only in chess value (not the look/feel of the old tome) then perhaps a modern book is more cost effective.

1
source | link

Which book? Assuming a GM wrote it... Well, here are the names of some GMs from the 70s: Fischer. Spassky. Tal. Smyslov. Kortchnoi. Geller. Larsen. Petrosian. Botvinnik... I think those men, and men like those men, still have the ability to impart lessons.

If you can stand descriptive notation, books from the 70s can still teach. And chances are, there are addenda on the web that call out faulty variations.

So it depends on the price. If these are $30 each, and you are interested only in chess value (not the look/feel of the old tome) then perhaps a modern book is more cost effective.