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If you want to get better at combinations, play tactical moves, such as pinning pieces with a bishop, moving rooks to open files, launching double attacks with a queen and a second piece, etc.

In one of my first combinations (playing Black), I had a rook on a king file with two bishops between it and the enemy king. I moved the first bishop e7 x Na3e7xNa3. White had to recapture. Then I moved my light-squared bishop, e6-g4e6-g4, attacking the queen on d1, and discovering a check with my rook on e8.

If you look for them, there will be plenty of opportunities to set things up. Then let your opponent look for a way to avoid them.

If you want to get better at combinations, play tactical moves, such as pinning pieces with a bishop, moving rooks to open files, launching double attacks with a queen and a second piece, etc.

In one of my first combinations (playing Black), I had a rook on a king file with two bishops between it and the enemy king. I moved the first bishop e7 x Na3. White had to recapture. Then I moved my light-squared bishop, e6-g4, attacking the queen on d1, and discovering a check with my rook on e8.

If you look for them, there will be plenty of opportunities to set things up. Then let your opponent look for a way to avoid them.

If you want to get better at combinations, play tactical moves, such as pinning pieces with a bishop, moving rooks to open files, launching double attacks with a queen and a second piece, etc.

In one of my first combinations (playing Black), I had a rook on a king file with two bishops between it and the enemy king. I moved the first bishop e7xNa3. White had to recapture. Then I moved my light-squared bishop, e6-g4, attacking the queen on d1, and discovering a check with my rook on e8.

If you look for them, there will be plenty of opportunities to set things up. Then let your opponent look for a way to avoid them.

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source | link

If you want to get better at combinations, play tactical moves, such as pinning pieces with a bishop, moving rooks to open files, launching double attacks with a queen and a second piece, etc.

In one of my first combinations (playing Black), I had a rook on a king file with two bishops between it and the enemy king. I moved the first bishop e7 x Na3. White had to recapture. Then I moved my light-squared bishop, e6-g4, attacking the queen on d1, and discovering a check with my rook on e8.

If you look for them, there will be plenty of opportunities to set things up. Then let your opponent look for a way to avoid them.